WW2 museum now open at Frieston Shore

The well known We’ll Meet Again mobile museum now has a static home at Freiston Shore, following a VIP Opening Event on 11th August. The museum is open to the public 10:00am to 16:00pm, Friday to Sunday, and will be offering private teaching events to schools and other organisations on three separate days, mid-week.

The team will still be able to offer their unique and critically acclaimed teaching experience to children, in a safe and secure environment, as well as display their impressive collection of WW1 and WW2 artefacts to all. Read Dame Vera Lynn’s endorsement Continue reading

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Vera gets a makeover in Canada

Don’t worry, it’s only temporary! Petwood Hotel Director Emma Brealey recently spent some time in Hamilton, Ontario, and sent back a souvenir video (via Facebook,) showing “our” Lancaster being transformed with the temporary markings of the Ruhr Express, KB700, Canada’s first built Lancaster. All was revealed at a special event at the Canadian Warplane Heritage museum. “It’s so wonderful to see our Canadian friends on screen again – and doesn’t Vera film well?!”

[If you can’t hear any sound, uncheck the default speaker mute setting on the Facebook player control bar at the bottom right of the screen]

Continue reading

Wartime Weekend, Metheringham

From Geoff Thompson, Lincolnshire TV:

Coming up,  a special weekend at the Metheringham Airfield Visitor Centre, formerly RAF Metheringham, celebrating the men and women of 101st Airborne Division, many of whom gave their lives in World War II.

The event is scheduled for 1st & 2nd May 2016 10 am to 5 pm.  All Adults £5, under 16s Free.

A large contingent of the North West 101st Airborne re-enactment group will be camping out on Metheringham Airfield using the backdrop of Dakota KG 651 which is based there, and there will be a BBMF Lancaster flypast on both days, weather permitting. Continue reading

Experience 600 years of history at Boston Guildhall Museum

I once heard a story that a visitor to Lincolnshire, on discovering that there is a town in our county called Boston, said how nice it was that we named our towns after cities in the USA. Of course it’s the other way round. In 1612 John Cotton, non-conformist Vicar of St Botolph’s Church (aka “The Stump”) in Boston Lincolnshire encouraged his flock to join the Massachusetts Bay Company, and he later helped to found the city of Boston, Massachusetts (1630).

This is a rather basic example of the kind of historical fact about Boston Lincolnshire that makes it a town well worth visiting if you are on our patch, and there are lots more. Did you know that earlier, in the eleventh and twelfth centuries, Boston was a major trading port, second only to London?  Or that by the opening of the thirteenth century, Boston ranked as a port of the Hanseatic League, the commercial and defensive confederation of merchant guilds and their market towns dominating Baltic maritime trade along the coast of Northern Europe?

There’s no better place to get the feel of Boston’s distant and recent past than its ancient Guildhall in South Street. Continue reading